Tuesday, October 19, 2004

Path of Least Resistance

Thanks to kev for his comment on the path of least resistance. you have given me yet another topic to ramble about.

I have to agree with you that the path of least resistance often makes good sense from several perspectives but the complicated part is to have the foresight, insight, and wisdom to determine what decisions and outcomes will lead to the simplest solution. I myself often try to go down the path of least resistance but due to circumstances beyond my control often end up going down the more complicated one.

The path of least resistance is a good friend of insight. and its to bad thats not a class in school. it would probably be lectured by the same professor that taught common sense. they would all be highly subjective classes. keith would fail. kev would argue till he got a grade out of beating the teacher and jen would get an A cause she made the professor cry. Dan would Slop through the proof in unreadable gyberish and then make his final line legible, thus fooling the professor into a grade. Sarah would probably do the homework and be the only one of us to get a well deserved grade.

3 comments:

palegreenhorse said...

hey! it's not like i try to make teachers cry. i just state my opinion and point to some facts to back up my point from a book for the class. now i'll be the first to say that a book (and pretty much everything in print or media) is definately failable. but there are cases where i thought through what the book said and i agreed with the book and the teacher never effectively conveyed that they disagreed with the book and cannot point to another source that backs up thier opinion. i ramble.
what i really wanted to say in my comment was that the path of least resistance is not the correct path, frequently. if we look at white's vision of the path to heaven it is narrow and difficult. in world politics it seems that the least resistive path often leads to innocent people dying (genocide, war, economic sanctions). i think that the class that keith refers to is probably attempted at by ethics class (which i think keith was the only one of our group to take?). does ethics allows us insight? perhaps.

oh ya, kev, i think that the old testament is a series of stories to prove many things. one of these things is that although God can improve things through killing we cannot. we kill the wrong people, for the wrong reasons, in the wrong way.

forkev said...

I beleive most is true, except that I see dan contacting the publisher, convincing them of another perspective, getting it in the second edition of the book, and THEN arguing for a grade based on having convinced the publisher...and having ajob offer from the publisher.

Kevin took ethics from Dr Clarence Anderson of the school of business at WWC (www.wwc.edu).
outstanding class. but i discovered that most ethical models fail my tests as they do not appeal for a higher/outside power, or a directing force from God. They just cook up stuff that says if it's the greatest good for all involved (how to you determine that) or that your obligation extends as far as your own rights (liberteraniasm) and a hogpog of other things. In the end i cooked up my own model that used liberteraniasm as a core, but looked to God for the answers and affirmation.


ethics does allow us to consider things, but it can be dangerous depending on the model as it can justify enron and other outrages.

I did not mean to badmouth the old testimate, only that war seems to prevail - and for that reason usa's war on iraq could be supported. I did not mean to say that humans fathered the idea when God was protecting his people.

forkev said...

and jen: the path of least resistence could still hold true in a spiritual perspective depending on where our focus is in life and what we use as a guiding force. A path that appears thin and difficult to worldly perspectives, may in fact appear as a superhighway to person who is in touch with God's will in their life.
Much the same way a hummingbirds eyes focus on the color of the flowers and grey out the background.
http://www.bellmuseum.org/imprint_birdseye03.html